Tuesday, July 5, 2022

Women offered different types of birth control

A poll found on Planned Parenthood’s official website displayed statistics about the discussion of sex and related topics between adults and their children. Around 82% of parents have talked to their kids about things involving sexuality, but only 60% have discussed birth control methods.

The Student Health Center on campus provides multiple options of birth control including pills, condoms, NuvaRing, Ortho Evra patch and Depo-Provera. Ortho Evra patches are worn by women on the skin of certain spots of the body and changed once a week. Depo-Provera is a birth control shot, injected by a nurse or doctor once every three months, according to Planned Parenthood’s website.

“While we don’t insert IUDs or Nexplanon, we are very familiar with these birth control methods and can answer questions, or refer students to off campus providers that insert IUDs or Nexplanon,” Assistant Director for Medical Services Susan Sand said.

Preventing unwanted pregnancies is a reason for using birth control, whether it be condoms or the pill. However, birth control can be used for a handful of other reasons as well.

Taking a birth control pill can help make women’s periods more regular or even lighter, ease the pain of migraines and endometriosis, a condition that causes heavy and painful periods. It can also clear a person’s skin of acne and cause less breakouts, according to WebMD.

There are different kinds of birth control pills, and not every pill suits every woman who goes on it. This can lead to some problems. Junior childhood education and special education major Erin Carey faced this issue with her birth control pill.

“I had to switch to a different kind because the first kind made me feel not like myself.” Carey said.

There are also some misconceptions surrounding the pill regarding weight gain and the effect antibiotics can have on it, making it not work, according to Sand.

“Most women believe that birth control pills will make them gain a lot of weight, but studies have shown that birth control pills have little to no effect on weight,” Sand said. “Only one antibiotic interferes with birth control pills, and that’s the tuberculosis antibiotic called Rifampin.”

Carey further noted how practicing safe sex when you get to college can be a difficult topic of conversation, and how that can lead to people forgoing a birth control method in their sex lives.

“The smart decision would be to go to Planned Parenthood where you can be anonymous,” Carey said. “Or go to the Health Center to get the necessary items.”

For sexually active students, Sand recommends getting tested for STDs at least once a year, even if you don’t have symptoms. Plattsburgh State students can even make birth control consultation appointments by calling Student Health at (518)-564-2187.

 

Email Annika Campbell at cp@cardinalpointsonline.com

- Advertisment -

Latest

Baseball breaks playoff drought

By Colin Bolebruch For the first time in a decade, the Plattsburgh Cardinals men’s baseball team is playoff-bound. This past weekend the Cardinals eked out a...

Cardinals Beat Saints

By Melanie Lanzo St. Lawrence University and the Plattsburgh Cardinals have a long history with previous back-to-back losses the Cardinals have experienced back in 2021....

Rugby punches ticket to nations

By Liam Sample The Plattsburgh men’s rugby team’s “miracle” run continued as they finished the regular season by winning the TNT Tournament at Memorial Field...

New, old clubs expand campus culture

By Sydney Hakes While higher education is a place for fine tuning one’s skills and defining career goals, campus life plays an important role in...