Studying can be challenging. Sometimes, you’re stuck reading the same sentence over and over again hoping that you will somehow retain it. People have different studying habits across the board. Some might prefer to lock themselves up in a carousel in the Feinberg Library. Others might opt to study in groups. With each scenario, there are pros and cons. If you study alone, you might face the danger of day dreaming. If you study in groups, it might just turn into another social hour. The benefits of studying together has many benefits provided that the group is focused. In Breyana Anderson’s FUSE article, “Better results after repeating information,” she delves into the idea that information is better retained when repeating it.

It’s simple. If you can convey the information you learned, there is sense of truly understanding it. The fact that you can talk about what you’ve learned shows that you didn’t just memorize a bunch of definitions—you actually applied them. You may be able to memorize formulas and definitions for a test, but what good is that if you can’t apply those skills?

Additionally, being able to talk about what you’ve learned out loud helps others as well. Maybe someone else might be struggling with the same study questions as you are. Don’t be afraid of sounding dumb. Chances are, others might be confused over the same question as you are. Being able to talk about it can only be helpful.

Use your professor as a resource. He or she might be able to make everything much clearer if you just sit down with them one one one.

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