Coming into college also means coming into your true self.

All throughout high school, there is an overwhelming pressure to fit in and be liked— a pressure to be one of the popular people.
In high school, it’s expected that you dress a certain way, talk about certain things and feint disinterest at others.

In college, there is less pressure to be liked, and there’s no sense of popularity in the high school context anyway.

Plattsburgh State has more than 80 different clubs and organizations. With that many clubs around, there is not just one popular group or circle to fit into.
Students can try different clubs or join clubs that match their skills and interests where they can fit in and get along with people with similar tastes.

Of course in each of these clubs and organizations, there are going to be people that are “popular” within the group, but there will be no pressure to try to fit in because you already will.
It’s important these skills and interests are realized so that a student can find what they are truly interested in pursuing as their majors or minors.

You don’t have classes with everyone because everybody is taking different classes for their major. Therefore, it means there can’t be one true popular group like there is in high school.
In high school, you have classes with everyone you know, and it’s always the same people. That’s what creates a true clique environment.

The point of college is to figure out who you are and who you want to be in the years to come after graduation. This can’t be accomplished if you are still pretending to be someone you’re not or if you’re trying to reject who you truly are.

Many students come into college with an idea of who or what they want to be when they graduate. “Almost a third of first-time college students choose a major then change it at least once within three years..”, according to Inside Higher Ed. com.

A lot of times students take a few classes required for their major and then decide they don’t want to pursue it, or they take a class as an elective and then decide they would rather pursue a major within that class realm.

Incoming students always feel like they have to answer the biggest question of their liives: who do you want be? When in reality, college is all about finding the answer to that question and embracing it.

You figure out if you actually want to be a pschycologist or if you really want to have red hair, you learn how you want to represent yourself to the world and above else how the world should see you.

It’s not expected that you be something great in the beginning, but it is expected that you always be true to who you are.

Email Abby Talcott at opinions@cardinalpointsonline.com

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