Thursday, December 3, 2020

COVID demands us to reflect

In our mentally demanding, rapidly evolving, work-centered society, it is difficult to take a pause and reflect. COVID-19 demands we do exactly that. 

We all face realities previously unimagined. The hardships that plague us make us question the stability of our governments, social institutions and connections to loved ones. Inspiration, motivation and positivity run thin, and some thoughts have become too heavy to handle. 

Will I be able to get a job after graduation? How long will I be working from home? Will I have enough to pay my bills this month? What if my dad gets sick? What if my mom does? 

Many of us are weighed down with this kind of fear and bleak uncertainty, but how many of us have stepped back from the chaos and cultivated a true sense of gratitude? It’s understandable and valid to worry during times like these, but it’s necessary to reflect on and appreciate what was, is and can be. 

Do you know the odds of being a human being? Some scientists estimate that it’s about 1 in 400 trillion. Others calculate a much higher unlikelihood.  

What that means is out of the cosmic bang that sprang life into existence, your atoms formed not into a rock, a blade of grass or bacteria on the bottom of the ocean floor, but into a beautiful, multidimensional human being in the 21st century. 

Every action and decision made by your ancestors, dating all the way back to the first single-celled organisms, perfectly aligned to create the consciousness that is you, in this present moment. Your life is literally a miracle. 

If that’s all too wishy-washy for you, consider the fact that this pandemic is a mere blip in your life-span. It feels like it’s been forever since life was “normal,” but it’s been three months since the first confirmed coronavirus case hit the U.S. and a little over a month since self quarantines and social distancing were introduced in New York. 

We may be lonely, but we are not alone — thanks to the internet. On top of FaceTime, Snapchat, and Tik Tok, we have Instagram, the host of several challenges that not only entertain us, but also remind us of the world before COVID-19 and the world that will come after. 

Trends such as the Art Recreation, Bill Clinton Album and Don’t Rush challenges connect us through creativity. Others such as the All In Challenge, Best NY Accent and iPads to Hospitals remind us of the fact that our humanity thrives even in the darkest of times. 

We are far from escaping the negative effects of this pandemic, but with all of this can come individuals much more aware and appreciative of the blessing that is face-to-face human connection. With all of this can come massive medical and health care reform, heightened awareness of hygiene across the globe and more respect for workers that have long been looked down upon — delivery drivers, food service employees, grocers, etc. 

It’s easy to get lost in negativity, but all it takes is one moment and a few deep breaths to orient one’s thoughts toward the positive. There’s a lot for us to worry about, but there is also a lot for us to cherish and look forward to. COVID-19 has changed the world, but some of that is and will be for the better. 

 

Email Lukas Hughes at cp@cardinalpointsonline.com


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