Thu. Feb 21st, 2019

A message from Cardinal Points editors

Many of you may have seen the illustration on top of the front page of this week’s Cardinal Points, accompanying the article “Minority admission rates examined.” It has come to our attention that the graphic in question not only has a disconnect to the article it was created to work with, but it also unintentionally features offensive and stereotypical elements that misrepresent African ­American students.

To be frank, we deeply regret the use of this graphic and any offense or harm it may have caused our friends and peers. As SUNY Plattsburgh students and editors of the newspaper, we are constantly trying to represent the campus community in the best possible way, and in this case, we did not do so.

Please know that we do not take this lightly and are using this as a constructive learning experience because we wish, more than anything, to remain an outlet of positivity and inclusion, where all members of our community feel safe and respected.

We are also including a link to our most recent editorial, discussing issues of racism and privilege, which we feel better emphasizes our stance.

8 thoughts on “A message from Cardinal Points editors

  1. It’s “come to your attention”? Really? How does sow thing so blatantly offensive, insulting and insensitive get past the editing process? Who was in the approval chain of command that had to say “yes” in order for this “art” to be published?

    Perhaps the same folks who penned this poorly written and insufficient apology?

    As a SUNY grad and media professional of nearly 40 years, this insulting and demeaning cartoon has no place on the front page of a student newspaper or any newspaper.

    Those responsible should accept a suspension for the remainder of the semester and use their newly found spare time to write stories to redeem the reputation of their paper and themselves, then apply for reinstatement. Their faculty advisor should consider doing the same.

  2. Editing is the process of selecting and preparing written, visual, audible and film media used to convey information. The editing process can involve correction, condensation, organization, and many other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate and complete work.

    The editing process often begins with the author’s idea for the
    work itself, continuing as a collaboration between the author and the editor as the work is created. As such, editing can involve creative skills, human relations and a precise set of methods.

    Copy editors correct spelling, grammar and align writings to house style.

    Editors have a responsibility to uphold the integrity of the material and respect the audiences that may come into view of their materials. This includes avoiding plagiarism, respecting copyright, avoiding unnecessarily offensive material and presenting appropriate materials.

    Many new editors make honest mistakes about how to edit correctly. Most do not cite their sources, and many are unaware of moral standards. For an obviously new editor, we should educate, not correct; help, not punish. However, when an editor displays obvious moral dishonesty, it should be dealt with swiftly and decisively.

  3. If you’re going to send students email asking us to attend a forum to discuss this, why is the image itself not available on the website? Just an apology article which doesn’t help.

  4. “It has come to our attention…” What level of attention could you possibly have to think this cartoon was normal, let alone appropriate? Insanity, particularly coming from “college-educated” journalists. I’m stunned.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: