Beginning next summer, the Plattsburgh State Neurobehavioral Sciences program will be tapping into a $4 million grant from the New York State Senate to expand the program and begin construction on a new center in Sibley Hall.

Currently, the program provides services to Plattsburgh-area residents affected by neurological issues, including adult respite day care, brain injury support, long-term care, developmental disabilities assistance, self-help training and clinical services, said Interim Director Michael Morales.

Grant money will allow the center to better integrate current services, such as the college’s Nexus Autism Spectrum Program, Traumatic Brain Injury Center, Alzheimer’s Disease Assistance Center, Third Age Adult Day Center, Neuropsychology Clinic and Psychoeducational Services, and the move is designed to open the center up to an increased number of clients, allow better public access, improve diagnostic and treatment programs and allow for greater research.

Due to these expected improvements, the revamped program will now allow for more PSUC student preparation in these areas.

NYS Senator Betty Little helped provide the PSUC program with the grant, which is part of the state’s 2014-2015 Enacted Budget that allotted $49 million for several capital projects.

“The creation of the Center for Neurobehavioral Health will enable Plattsburgh to help meet the needs of those suffering from neurological health problems,” Little said in a PSUC press release.

“As we know, these issues are very complex and extremely challenging. More diagnostic and treatment programs, new training opportunities and expanded collaborative research will ensure better outcomes from those affected,” she said.

The entirety of the renovations will cost up to $8.5 million. The remaining $4.5 million will be provided by the SUNY Construction Fund.

Morales said that since joining the Center’s staff in fall of 1999, he believes it has done great work.

“Since coming on at the Center as Interim Executive Director, and having an opportunity to work with and observe staff, it has been my observation that they do an excellent job in providing services through our day programs and waiver services, through our grant-funded programs, and through our clinical operations,” Morales said.

The expansion of the program’s services, Morales said, will continue to provide training and educational experiences to future health care professionals, mental health care professionals and school psychologists as well as provide research opportunities.

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<a href="http://cardinalpointsonline.com/byline/maggie-mcvey/" rel="tag">Maggie McVey</a>